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petroselinum crispum common name

Petroselinum crispum, called parsley, is a culinary herb that is native to Europe and the Mediterranean. Petroselinum crispum (Mill.) Carum petroselinum (L.) Benth & Hook.f. Parsley is the common name for a bright green, biennial herb of European origin, Petroselinum crispum, which is extensively cultivated for its leaves, which are used as a garnish or for flavoring food. & Hook. genus: Petroselinum Hill; Other names with Apium crispum Mill. It is now grown world-wide for its is aromatic edible leaves which may be used fresh or dried in soups, salads and a wide variety of other food dishes (e.g., potatoes, fish, stews, vegetables, omelets). It is noted for attracting wildlife. Quick Info: Host plant for Black Swallowtail and Anise Swallowtail Butterflies, Pretty Foliage, Common Herb, Annual/Biennial. tuberosum, the taproot is enlarged and can be used like a small parsnip. Parsley or garden parsley (Petroselinum crispum) is a species of flowering plant in the family Apiaceae that is native to the central and eastern Mediterranean region (Sardinia, Lebanon, Israel, Cyprus, Turkey, southern Italy, Greece, Portugal, Spain, Malta, Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia), but has naturalized elsewhere in Europe, and is widely cultivated as an herb, and a vegetable. Scientific Name(s): Petroselinum crispum (Mill.) Fuss ›Petroselinum crispum var. Hill, diArk - a resource for eukaryotic genome research. History Petroselinum, the specific name of the Parsley, from which our English name is derived, … The National Vegetation Survey (NVS) Databank is a physical archive and electronic databank containing records of over 94,000 vegetation survey plots - including data from over 19,000 permanent plots. Petroselinum crispum forma radicosum Petroselinum crispum (Miller) Fuss, forma radicosum (Alefeld) Danert, in Mansfeld, Kulturpflanze, Beih. Cytotoxicity and apoptotic activity has been demonstrated in vitro using human cancer cell lines, possibly by antioxidant activity.15, 19, 20, 21, 22, Research reveals no clinical data regarding the use of parsley or its extracts in cancer. It is in flower from June to August, and the seeds ripen from July to September. 1995 - 2020, Sorting Petroselinum Names. The other common names for the herb parsley are Apium petroselinum, Petroselinum lativum, Petersylinge, Curly Parsley, Flat-leaved Parsley and devils oat meal. Parsley, in addition to being a source of certain vitamins and minerals, has been used traditionally for widespread uses. parsley; Other Scientific Names. Petroselinum hortense Hoffm. Disclaimer: The NCBI taxonomy database is not an authoritative Common Name(s): parsley [English] Accepted Name(s): Petroselinum crispum (Mill.) This information is not specific medical advice and does not replace information you receive from your health care provider. National Germplasm Resources Laboratory, Beltsville, Maryland. Nyman ex A. W. Hill, Petroselinum crispum (P. Database (Oxford). Generally recognized as safe when used as food (GRAS). Native Introduced Native and Introduced. Clinical trials are, however, lacking to support any therapeutic recommendations. 1913. Australia. Parsley leaf has been used at daily doses of 6 g5; however, no clinical studies have been found that support this dose. Safety and efficacy for dosages above those in foods are unproven and should be avoided. This information should not be used to decide whether or not to take this product. Bruised leaves have been used to treat tumors, insect bites, lice, skin parasites, and contusions.5, 6 Parsley tea at one time was used to treat dysentery and gallstones.5 Other traditional uses reported include treatment of diseases of the prostate, liver, and spleen, in the treatment of anemia, arthritis, and cancers, as an expectorant, antimicrobial, aphrodisiac, hypotensive, laxative, and as a scalp lotion to stimulate hair growth.5, 7, Myristicin, a compound found in parsley oil, is suggested to be in part responsible for the hallucinogenic effect of nutmeg.

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